location and mise-en-scene was an important factor within corporate photography I found  when researching the form before the shoot. What’s in the shot around the subject is just as important as the person, unless of course you’re shooting someone already heavily established within the community/mainstream society.
If photographing the likes of Richard Branson or Alan Sugar then you don’t necessarily need a B/G that connotes business at all. Just a simple plain white studio backdrop will do for a simplee, quick shoot. For unknown subjects, however, you need to photograph something that confirms the business for the client. For example, I assisted on the shoot for a guy in the class who shot a car showroom owner. For his two shots he chose to photograph the guy in one of the cars in the showroom and then leaning on another car outside with his business logo in shot on the wall behind him. You don’t need any captions or text to establish what the subject does for the viewer, the photograph says it all.
With this in mind, I planned my shoot with Fiona in a way that ensured the subject was established to my audience. More specifically, I planned for a magazine that would be more of a local paper to my hometown. Therefore my first shot of Fiona in front of the school water tower would easily establish to my readers that this is the head teacher at Maryhill. The second shot includes students and some media equipment to further establish the school and it’s media specialist status.

location and mise-en-scene was an important factor within corporate photography I found  when researching the form before the shoot. What’s in the shot around the subject is just as important as the person, unless of course you’re shooting someone already heavily established within the community/mainstream society.

If photographing the likes of Richard Branson or Alan Sugar then you don’t necessarily need a B/G that connotes business at all. Just a simple plain white studio backdrop will do for a simplee, quick shoot. For unknown subjects, however, you need to photograph something that confirms the business for the client. For example, I assisted on the shoot for a guy in the class who shot a car showroom owner. For his two shots he chose to photograph the guy in one of the cars in the showroom and then leaning on another car outside with his business logo in shot on the wall behind him. You don’t need any captions or text to establish what the subject does for the viewer, the photograph says it all.

With this in mind, I planned my shoot with Fiona in a way that ensured the subject was established to my audience. More specifically, I planned for a magazine that would be more of a local paper to my hometown. Therefore my first shot of Fiona in front of the school water tower would easily establish to my readers that this is the head teacher at Maryhill. The second shot includes students and some media equipment to further establish the school and it’s media specialist status.

These were the second set of shots I took whilst at home over the BOSS weekend. In the same room as Benji was photographed in…

I tried to play around with the dead space in these shots. If you imagine, you could see the text etc place around her in the magazine layout. My biggest problem with these shots are the distortion the wider focal lengths give…I had no choice as the working space was far too enclosed…I’d much prefer to work in a larger studio environment so I could work with more flattering focal lengths between 85-135mm…

When I was home in Stoke for the weekend I photographed Fiona, I kept practising with the ranger flash whilst I had it. As the weather was bad in Stoke over that weekend, I wanted to get some photographs taken with the gear whilst I had it. Just because I couldn’t shoot for the project doesn’t mean I can’t get some shots for my own portfolio whilst I have it. May as well take advantage of the fact I have the equipment.

The main batch of shots I produced were actually in my house in the room I stay in when I’m home. the room has white walls and therefore were ideal to photograph in. It’s a small room so composition was restrained but I think I managed to get some decent shots of Benji. I really wouldn’t mind being a rock photographer and I saw some shots of Keith Richards by Ross Halfin taken in this style….against a white wall in B/W.

The outdoor shot was taken at our local landmark, Mow Cop castle. It was icy as hell up there and very bloody cold but we managed to get some decent shots…before Benji almost smashed my vintage EKO twelve string on the ice…

This is the combination that my brother suggested I use.

The portrait shot is a juxtaposed feel to the 1:1. She is more positive and inviting whereas the second shot is more dynamic and relatable to the context of the location. Plus, the water tower (which is distinguishing landmark in kidsgrove) can be seen more clearly than any of the other shots outside. I used a longer focal length which compresses the sense of distance brining things closer together.

I also enjoy how she seems to be leaning into the text on the first shot. We can also see more of her features in this shot as opposed to the moodier image where her face is hidden in chiaroscuro lighting.

kjohnnyw:

Corporate photography is a form of photography I have never planned on attempting. Being of a more rebellious and rock nature, the idea has never appealed to me but as they say, there is a first time for everything.

Corporate photography seems to follow a general set of rules which are to empower an individual but also make them seem approachable, represent and empower the company they represent and sell the product/brand they offer.

There are several exceptions, such as Richard Branson who seems to thoroughly enjoy his publicity in the media. He does not conform to the expectations when it comes to corporate photography. He refuses to wear suits, ties or to pose in a conventional way for a business icon. However, the style of lighting and general photography follows the same guidelines as conventional business photography.

Other exceptions include the likes of Sir Alan Sugar who always appears far more empowered than is strictly necessary in his photographs. This would be due to his participation in the entertainment side of mainstream media. His reputation as the ‘hard to please’ badass of business mostly earned it’s fame from ‘The Apprentice’ series and this is often reflected within his portraits.

kjohnnyw:

These two shots are from our first location flash lesson. We went outside of the university just in front of the O2 arena with one ranger flash unit. I was first to shoot in our group, I wanted to get shots with the pillars and poles from the O2 arc and the fountains on the floor. I also wanted to photograph the sun as it was at a beautiful angle by the time we went out to shoot.

I tried both high and low angles for the shoot and found that both perspectives can work depending on the feel of the shot you’re trying to capture. I found that the better shots were more dramatic exposures where clouds and the sun add an atmospheric dynamic, shoot from a lower angle to capture more of the location whilst keeping the subject the main focus of the shot.